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A fantasy retelling of Jack The Ripper’s gruesome return to his old tricks, placed inside an urban fantasy version of London, starring the closest thing to an occult cost-effective James Bond, the Whitechapel Demon is, if nothing else, a very entertaining read through and through.

Starring the occult detective (and newest keeper of the title of ‘Queen’s Conjurer’), Charles St. Cyprian, The Whitechapel Demon is at first read, an urban fantasy whydunit. The idea of the Ripper’s manifestation as a supernatural being perhaps isn’t new (certain details in the story reminded me of a certain storyline in the Hellblazer comic book series by Vertigo) but the author manages to put a particularly refreshing and above all, well-researched spin on it. From the grimy, grim life in the novel’s 1920’s London all the way to the particulars regarding the application of the occult practices of Crowley’s Golden Dawn, I could not help but appreciate the author’s attention to detail.

Looking past the esoteric details, The Whitechapel Demon remains a gripping read. While certain elements of the investigative process were left, at times, sketchy (a weak point for me, as I am a sucker for a good mystery) the action and the atmosphere alone more than made up for it.

The Whitechapel Demon is published by Emby Press

About The Author

Konstantine

Konstantine is a writer by choice. His short stories have been published in Haikaosru's Battle Royale-Slam Book, the AE Canadian SF Review and the Savage Beasts anthology by Grey Matter Press. People tell him he's got a writing problem, but he's recently managed to have one of his stories published in Japanese so he guesses he's still got it under control. He's got a Patreon Account, where he writes SF flash fiction and dreams to one day isolating himself in a little house in the mountains, where he will live off the land and order groceries from Amazon, like his glorious ancestors.

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